The Proceedings of the United States Anti-Masonic Convention, Held at Philadelphia, September 11, 1830; Embracing the Journal of Proceedings, the Reports, the Debates, and the Address to the People

The Proceedings of the United States Anti-Masonic Convention, Held at Philadelphia, September 11, 1830; Embracing the Journal of Proceedings, the Reports, the Debates, and the Address to the People

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1830 edition. Excerpt: ...presses now in operation, have been constrained to give publicity to this matter, or have been established expressly for the purpose; of the old presses in New York and the eastern states, not ten have even yet opened their columns in any manner. Last winter the report of a public officer was made to the legislature of the state; an official document entitled to high credit. Yet that report never saw the light, through the columns of our public press in any of the large towns and cities of our state, or in very few if any. There was scarcely a press that dare give publicity to that document, sanctioned as it was by high official authority, except the presses of an anti-masonic character. The history of the trials, where free-masons put at defiance the power of the law; where witnesses refused to answer after being sworn, and triumphed in the success of their obstinacy; that history has never been published in the public papers, except by those which are anti-masonic. Ought not such facts to arouse our citizens? But means must be found to make the facts known; and when known, the facts alone would demonstrate the importance of this enquiry. Mr. Todd, of Pennsylvania, said that he had not called for the reasons in favour of this resolution from any hostility to it. He had thought that perhaps the object was embraced in the duties of another committee. He was decidedly in favour of the inquiry, which he considered a very important one. The first information that he had received in relation to Morgan was, that he was in Canada attending a bar; then that he was at Smyrna, wearing the turban, and afterwards that he was among our Indians, wearing the breech-cloth; and next that he was on shipboard. This was the kind of information which we received, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 120 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236591453
  • 9781236591456