Proceedings of the Tax-Payers' Convention of South Carolina, Held at Columbia, Beginning May 9th, and Ending May 12th, 1871

Proceedings of the Tax-Payers' Convention of South Carolina, Held at Columbia, Beginning May 9th, and Ending May 12th, 1871

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1871 edition. Excerpt: ...history of civilized communities, certainly of those which claim to be Republican communities. It is not proposed to consider this matter in the light of race, or color, or party, but simply and exclusively in the light of property-holding and nonproperty-holding. What has been done in the matter of citizenship and suffrage has been done, and we are not asking that it be reversed. What we do ask is, that in considering our condition, and the mode of relief for it, the facts about to be stated will be kept in mind. The first of these facts is--That the voting population of the State, that which wields the political power, is divided by a broad, distinct line, into two great classes--the one property-holding and taxpaying, the other non-property-holding and non-taxpaying. The second is--That the great preponderance of political power is in the hands of the non-taxpayers, constituting a large, fixed majority, who are banded together, and persistently refuse to the taxpayers a fair representation for the protection of their property interests. The third is--That the people who pay the taxes have substantially no voice in laying or expending them, and that those who lay and expend the taxes neither contribute to them nor feel the weight of them. ' The sum and substance of all this is that the great proprietary interest, representing some $170,000,000 of value, is taxed ad libitum, without its consent or due representation, by those who do not feel any part of the burden, but enjoy all the fruits of the spoliation. Is not this condition of things without its like or parallel, whether in theory or practice, wherever Representative Government exists? Could a similar condition of thin s be maintained for any length of time in any free State of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 82 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 163g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236992172
  • 9781236992178