Proceedings of the Second Pan American Scientific Congress, Washington, U.S.A., Monday, December 27, 1915 to Saturday, January 8, 1916; Section VI - International Law, Public Law and Jurisprudence Volume 10,

Proceedings of the Second Pan American Scientific Congress, Washington, U.S.A., Monday, December 27, 1915 to Saturday, January 8, 1916; Section VI - International Law, Public Law and Jurisprudence Volume 10,

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ...of fine sieves. The pollen itself is thoroughly dried immediately _and preserved in the dry state until it is to be extracted. 1. The pollen is mixed with sufficient physiological saline solution (0.8-5 per cent) to make a fairly thick paste. 2. The paste is transferred to a porcelain ball mill and ground for 24 hours, or until microscopic examination shows that the pollen grains are broken, 3. Physiological saline solution is added and the resultant mixture is centrifuged to remove insoluble debris. 4. The extracted protein is purified by precipitation with acetone. 5. The precipitate is dried and thus preserved until needed. 6. For use, the precipitate is dissolved in physiological saline solution. The amount of protein-nitrogen in this solution is determined by the Kjeldahl method. 7. The solution is then diluted so that each cubic centimeter will contain certain fractions of a milligram of protein-nitrogen. 8. The lowest dilution, 1 c. c. of which may be used as the initial dose in treatment, contains 0.0025 mg. V 9. The final solutions are preserved from contamination by the addition of 0.25 per cent three cresols and sterilized by filtration. Sterility is determined by careful aerobic and anaerobic cultural tests. The treatment may be continued with increasing multiples of this amount according to the needs and the sensitiveness of the patient. The injections are first given at about 5-day intervals, but as soon as the period of relief has been found these intervals are shortened or lengthened, that is, if treatment is necessary during the season. We consider this better technique than to depend upon ophthalmo reactions which may be dangerous or upon sldn tests which merely complicate the procedure for the clinician. In other...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 408 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 21mm | 726g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236922506
  • 9781236922502