Proceedings of the Second Pan American Scientific Congress, Washington, U.S.A., Monday, December 27, 1915 to Saturday, January 8, 1916

Proceedings of the Second Pan American Scientific Congress, Washington, U.S.A., Monday, December 27, 1915 to Saturday, January 8, 1916

By (author) 

List price: US$22.39

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ...belt, or part of machine that men are likely to get caught in should, when practicable, be guarded; and when not so protected should be See illustrations, opposite page. reported, and every dangerous condition, defective car, engine, machine, careless practice or custom should be reported to some member of the safety committee or other proper oificer in order that the same may be remedied before, and not after, some one is killed or injured. Safety postal cards are furnished for that purpose. A switchman had kicked car in on track No. 10 and afterwards kicked some cars in on other tracks. Then he rode a car down on the track next to track No. 10. Another switchman, before he threw the switch for the last cut, noticed that the first car was close, measured the distance in the usual way, thought it would clear, but it was too close to clear a man, and the switchman, who was riding on the side of car, was knocked off and killed. (See fig. 3.) Rule No. 963 requires that cars must be pushed in on siding far enough to clear. Why not do it? If it had been done, this man's life vould not have been sacrificed and it would have taken less time to do it than it did to make a report of the accident. During the year 1913 we have had six other men injured from the same cause. August 13, 1913, a machinist, while repairing an engine, struck the calking tool with a hammer, when a piece of steel flew and seriously injured his eye. (See fig. 4.) The company had furnished goggles to prevent just such injuries, but this man failed to use them. Would it not be better to do so when doing work of this kind than to lose your vision? A switch foreman working on track coupling up empty cars was killed; as he was attempting to go between moving cars or push...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 356 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 19mm | 635g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236792823
  • 9781236792822