Proceedings of the Second Pan American Scientific Congress; (Section III) Conservation of Natural Resources. G. M. Rommel, Chairman Volume 3

Proceedings of the Second Pan American Scientific Congress; (Section III) Conservation of Natural Resources. G. M. Rommel, Chairman Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ...are distributed to all parts of the country; it can not be said, however, that ii profit Is always realized. Production in these western sections Is certain to increase rapidly in the near future and those interested in the growth and distribution of these products are thoughtfully planning for the future. It is believed that the standardization of their products Is absolutely essential and ought possibly to be placed at the head of their marketing program. This is true not only in our irrigated States, but in every producing section. The question of the standardization of farm products is not a new one, but during recent years growers and shippers have come to realize Its need very keenly, and the wholesale and retail trade have shown an ever-Increasing and Insistent demand for better prepared produce until to-day this Is one of the most important phases of our marketing problem. From the viewpoint of the economist this problem is of vital importance and Its solution Is worthy of his best endeavors, because the wastes and losses which producers now suffer in marketing perishable products are due to a considerable extent to the poor condition in which they are forwarded to market. Investigators of the so-called high cost of living will find the consumer directly affected by all marketing practices which are not efficient and economical. In the past little attention has been given to this question, because until comparatively recent years our cities, large and small, depended upon nearby ( producing sections for most of their fruits and produce. Transportation, refrigeration, and other facilities for handling farm products have been gradually developed until now we are not surprised to find Oregon apples) on sale in Maine and Florida; New Jersey...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 534 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 27mm | 943g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236660420
  • 9781236660428