Proceedings of the National Convention of United States Export Trade, Held in Tamadge Hall, Washington, D.C. February 19 and 20, 1878

Proceedings of the National Convention of United States Export Trade, Held in Tamadge Hall, Washington, D.C. February 19 and 20, 1878

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1878 edition. Excerpt: ...to give up his unprofitable wooden ship; he clings to it with a love intensified by age. Last summer we used every effort, with some of the' most prominent ship owners of this country, to induce them to build iron sailing ships; we offered to build ships at English prices, and out of better materials and workmanship; and still further, to retain the ownership of one-half the vessels, but we failed entirely to induce even one to build. With these inducements offered and rejected by our ship owners, will they go to England and buy their ships? I think not. If the law is "put in limbo," what will be the result? We open the gate wide--the American ship owner has not the heart to invest in iron ships; the tempting and long coveted field is open to the English ship owner; he enters and takes possession, and would surely wipe out the legitimate American lines, and absorb mainly our coastwise and river carrying trade. If it would pay Americans to go abroad to buy foreign ships, it would certainly pay those foreigners to bring their ships here and put them in this trade and retain the ships through nominal owners. I have talked with prominent steamship owners, engaged in running steam lines on our coast; I asked them, do you want free ships? They answer, No! the competition at present makes the business unprofitable--let the English ship owner come in with his cheap ships, and we are utterly ruined, and the vessels we have will be depreciated to half their value. The steamship owners of our coast lines have long since learned the value of iron propeller ships. There is scarcely a line of any importance that is not using them. I have asked them, are you satisfied with the prices you pay for them, and the answer has always been, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236834402
  • 9781236834409