Proceedings of Meeting Held in the Senate Chamber, Madison, Wis., Wednesday, July 16th, 1884; To Consider the Subject of Deaf-Mute Instruction in Relation to the Work of the Public Schools

Proceedings of Meeting Held in the Senate Chamber, Madison, Wis., Wednesday, July 16th, 1884; To Consider the Subject of Deaf-Mute Instruction in Relation to the Work of the Public Schools

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1885 edition. Excerpt: ...speech, its advocates claim that this system promotes it, and that it is a valuable aid to the acquisition of lip-reading. In Mr. E. Grosselin's works teachers are advised to give special lessons in articulation to the deaf out of the regular schoolhours. The first phonomimic school was opened in Paris in 1865. The next year a society to promote the system was formed by Mr. Grosselin. This society was recognized by the government as of public utility in 1875, and has been kept up through the activity of Mr. Emile Grosselin, son of the founder. Mr. E. Grosselin pronounces the benefit derived from the association of deaf children in special day-schools alongside of the public schools a will?' the wisp which has been pursued in vain. The statistics of 1881 give 177 deaf children in phonomimic schools, and those of 1882 report 164 deaf children in 106 phonomimic schools in France and Algiers. The principal works of Mr. A. Grosselin are "The Phonomimic Method of Making Reading Easy and Attractive, and Permitting the Simultaneous Instruction of Deaf-Mute and Hearing Children," 1864, and "A Manual of the Phonornimic Method," etc., (3d ed., ) 1881. A "congress" of persons interested in the amelioration of the condition of deaf-mutes and the blind was held in Paris in 1878. At this meeting the relation of deaf-mute instruction to the public schools was one of the topics discussed by educators of the deaf. Mr. Magnat, of the Pereire School in Paris, declared himself "in accord with all instructors who have seriously studied this question; 'the instruction of the deaf-mute, demanding a peculiar method and processes of its own not applicable to ordinary children, necessarily refuses itself to instruction in common.'...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 32 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 77g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236861019
  • 9781236861016