Proceedings of the Joint Convention of the Southwestern Inter-State Coal Operators' Association and the United Mine Workers of America, Districts 14, 21, 25; Convened at Pittsburg, Kansas, July 12, 1904

Proceedings of the Joint Convention of the Southwestern Inter-State Coal Operators' Association and the United Mine Workers of America, Districts 14, 21, 25; Convened at Pittsburg, Kansas, July 12, 1904

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ...If records are worth anything at all as evidence, this demand for a differential is absolutely unfounded, so far as the earnings of the men are concerned. Our records are unchallenged and practically uncriticised. We have taken the mine which was selected by Mr. Wardjon, with the knowledge on his part as well as on the part of the rest of us, that the conditions in that mine are probably more unfavorable than the conditions in any other mine in this district, either in the low coal or the so called high coal. We are ready to vote whenever the other side is. If we are going to vote on it now I don't understand what Mr. Richardson means when Mr. Richardson says they are not ready--on the eve of taking a vote at his own suggestion--I do not understand what he means when he says he is not ready to submit his evidence. Does he mean that hereafter he is to bring in that evidence? Or are we to believe that this case is closed and that the introduction of evidence is over? That ought to be determined before We vote. We have offered statistics showing what the men are earning and what they have arned in those so called low coal mines. Mr. Richardson--Mr. Perry makes a statement there that it is an easy matter for us to collect evidence from the check weighman. Mr. Perry knows more about the coal business than that. He knows very well the check weighman does not know how many horsebacks are cut, how many rooms are turned, how much entry is driven or how much gobbing is done, all of which goes to affect the earnings of the miner. We can get the check weighman's bulletins, it is true, and get the amount of coal, but that is not the net earnings or the gross earnings of the miners. That is not the net or gross earnings you have brought in here. The net and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 134 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 254g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236675509
  • 9781236675507