Proceedings of the Illinois State Bar Association Volume 19, PT. 1896

Proceedings of the Illinois State Bar Association Volume 19, PT. 1896

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1896 edition. Excerpt: ...of his claim, and subsequently finds that he has lost the benefit of his invention thereby. Of course, no Act of Congress can put brains and intelligence into the head of an examiner; but a Commissioner of Patents, thoroughly imbued with the real spirit and policy of the law, could abrogate this evil here referred to within a very short time. All these evils, however, are evils in the administration of the law, and not in the law itself. Theoretically, the law is substantially perfect as it now stands. If the inventor goes to an incompetent solicitor, or yields to an unreasonable requirement on the part of the Patent Office Examiner, it is, in a certain sense, his own fault. At all events, he, alone, suffers the consequences. The public are amply protected under the present law, and have no reason to find any fault with it. Congress has never placed upon the Statute books a law which has conduced more largely and generally, and will still in the future conduce more largely and generally to the public interest, than the Patent Law. There is not a home in the country which has not been rendered more pleasant, not a farm which has not been rendered more profitable, not a mile of travel which has not been rendered more easy and luxurious, not a shop or a factory whose production has not been increased, and not an article in use which has not been rendered better or cheaper, through the beneficient operation of this system. Every citizen should look upon it as a piece of legislation in his own personal interest--as something to be preserved and, if possible, improved, but never to be shorn of those features which foster and reward the exercise of invention and discovery, and thereby contribute so powerfully to "promote the progress of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 112 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236738160
  • 9781236738165