Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy

Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy : Volume XXXI (2015)

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Description

This volume, the thirty-first year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2014-15. Paper topics include: the volatility of in the Symposium as not self-directed to good or bad; the 'analytical' reading of the tripartite soul as autonomous sub-agents and whether it resembles neuroscience; holiness in the Euthyphro as misconstrued by the difficulty translating finite passives and passive participles in English; evil in Proclus as an indefinite nature redefined by privation, subcontrary and parypostasis, contrary to Plotinus' identification of matter and evil; Plato's literary reworking of the encounter of Odysseus with the Cyclops in the Sophist and of his struggle with the suitors in the Statesman.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 232 pages
  • 155 x 235 x 15.24mm | 376g
  • Leiden, Netherlands
  • English
  • 9004321977
  • 9789004321977

About William Wians

Gary M. Gurtler, S.J., is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Boston College. He has published on Ancient Philosophy, including two books: most recently Ennead IV.4.30-45 & IV.5, Translation and Commentary (2015), and co-edited Ancient and Medieval Concepts of Friendship (2014).

William Wians is Professor of Philosophy at Merrimack College. He has edited eleven previous volumes of BACAP proceedings. His collection Logos and Muthos: Philosophical Essays in Greek Literature was published in 2009. A second volume is in preparation.

Contributors include: James Ambury, Rachel Barney, Gary Gurtler, Aryeh Kosman, Tim Mahoney, Keith McPartland, Dmitri Nikulin, Zdravko Planinc, Vasilis Politis, Katja Vogt.
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