Proceedings of the Annual Convention of the Association of American Agricultural Colleges & Experiment Stations Volume 33

Proceedings of the Annual Convention of the Association of American Agricultural Colleges & Experiment Stations Volume 33

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ...agent; and almost if not quite as much stress is laid upon the necessity of adequate practical experience as upon proper college training, if competency is secured. Much of the potential material is weeded out all along the line. It is impossible at the present time for the colleges to meet the demand for competent men and women in these professional lines. Then there is a rapidly increasing demand for trained men in the agricultural industries, as managers and specialists of various kinds. The salaries paid are often much larger than are customary in college, school and state work. A rapidly increasing number of graduates are entering industry on their own account. Thus there is being constantly developed an increasing inter-relation and interest between the colleges on the one side and the farms, homes, schools and industries on the other. These workers and leaders have great and difficult problems to solve. They must have the help of the college specialists. Libraries and laboratories must at all times be available. This touch with new problems keeps the work on the campus alive. It has an excellent and inspiring reaction on the students in training. It requires the closest cooperation of all subject-matter, as well as of administrative, departments. I am asked to point out how this work can be most effectively organized. I desire to say at the outset that I do not think that it is possible even if it were desirable to devise a method of organization that would work equally well in all colleges. There is a tendency at the present time to lay too much stress on uniformity. This destroys initiative. There are, on the other hand, certain difficulties attending some types of organization that should be overcome or avoided. For example, a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 162 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 299g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236738179
  • 9781236738172