Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Taxation Held Under the Auspices of the National Tax Association-Tax Institute of America Volume 14, PT. 1921

Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Taxation Held Under the Auspices of the National Tax Association-Tax Institute of America Volume 14, PT. 1921

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1922 edition. Excerpt: ...This does not increase the final burden upon the land, inasmuch as the buildings very soon come upon the tax duplicate, as it is generally called. Among the many reasons why we should not tax separately the value of the land and the value of improvements due to the application of labor and capital, is one that in itself should be decisive; namely, the difficulty of separating the two values. Improvements become in many cases so blended with the land itself that they are indistinguishable and inseparable. While this is particularly the case with respect to agricultural land, it is often impossible to make this separation even in the case of urban land, where we have to do with grading down elevations, filling in depressions, beautification of land surrounding homes, successful efforts of home owners to build up their cities and to add to the amenities of their own residential district, the joint expenditures of owners of business property to develop the economic advantages of their cities, and many other sorts of constructive work of landowners, too numerous to be mentioned. The administrative and general economic difficulties involved in the separation of land values, "prairie values," as they are called in England, and the value of improvements led to the shipwreck of the English increment taxes established by the Lloyd George budget of 1909. It is acknowledged officially that the impossibility of making this separation caused the failure of the increment taxes and their abandonment by Chamberlain in the budget of 1920. When I was in England in 1913 and engaged in the study of land problems, the chief effect of the increment taxes that I observed was a depression of land values, a general feeling of discouragement of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 232 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 422g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236814401
  • 9781236814401