Proceedings of the Agassiz Institute, of Sacramento, Cal; With the Constitution and By-Laws, and the Names of the Officers and Members. Incorporated Nov. 12, 1872

Proceedings of the Agassiz Institute, of Sacramento, Cal; With the Constitution and By-Laws, and the Names of the Officers and Members. Incorporated Nov. 12, 1872

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1872 edition. Excerpt: ...much in these islands to gladden the heart ot the Arab trader; for here abonnded gold. silver, ivory, apes and peacocks, and the precious gums and spices and woods and jewels that were the delight of that picturesque age. The subject of " protection" was understood by these primitive merchants in its quiddity, as all those rare commodities were placed under the guardianship of dragons, winged serpents, and some other monsters as ferocious as they were elusive ot the naturalist, as complete as that of the Dodo or the Megatherium. Following down the stream of time we come to the tales of Marco Polo, to the adventurous and brilliant days of Prince Henry the Navigator, Albuquerque the Great, and of numerous other illustrious persons who made this region the theater of their exploits But it was not till a comparatively recent date that any definite intorniation was had regarding the archipelago; for in the thirteenth century we find Marco Polo speaking oi Java as " the greatest island in the world," giving it a compass of more than three thousand miles; and even as late as the close of the sixteenth century Van Linscboten says of it: "Touching its breadth, it is not found, because as yet it is not discovered, nor by the inhabitants themselves well known. Some think it is firme land and parcell of the ccuntrie called "Terra incognita, ' which being so. should reach from that place to the Cape of Good Hope, but as yet," he douhtfully remarks. "it is not certainly known, and therefore it is accounted for an island." Concerning Sumatra--.then called Java Minor, sometimes Taprobana--I am tempted to quote a paragraph or two from the pages of the incomparable Venetian: " When you leave the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 46 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236900758
  • 9781236900753