Problems in Animal Metabolism; A Course of Lectures Given in the Physiological Laboratory of the London University at South Kensington in the Summer Term, 1904

Problems in Animal Metabolism; A Course of Lectures Given in the Physiological Laboratory of the London University at South Kensington in the Summer Term, 1904

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ...been divided, and one of them tetanised for some hours, and the fat in the corresponding muscles on the two sides compared. But no evidence for the immediate consumption of fat in muscular activity has been obtained in this way. In one experiment of this kind, I found that both in the gastrocnemius and the tibiales on the tetanised side, there was rather more fat, reckoned in percentage of the dry substance, than on the side that had been kept at rest. Zuntz and Bogdanoff found that the effect of stimulating muscles was to diminish in them the amount of those combinations of fatty acids which cannot be extracted directly with ether.2 It is doubtful whether the utilisation of fat in muscular activity can be proved by stimulating the muscles with the circulation normally maintained through them. But in other ways it has been established beyond doubt that the muscles can and do make use of fat as a source of energy. To begin with, Zuntz and his pupils have shown that muscular activity does not alter the respiratory quotient unless the work is severe enough to interfere with the oxygen-supply to the muscles. This may hold when the work done is sufficient to increase the oxygen consumption more than threefold. This great increase in the 1 Leathes, //. of Phys., xxxi., p. ii., 1904. 2 Zuntz and Bogdanoff, D. R. A. 13, 1897; Pfl. A. 65, 81. rate of oxidation in the body is unaccompanied by any increase, or at least any material increase, in the nitrogen output: so that the energy must be supplied by non-nitrogenous material. If this increased metabolism involved only carbohydrates, the respiratory quotient must be raised: since it is not, fat as well as carbohydrate must be made use of to supply the muscles with what they require for their work. Even in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 66 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 136g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236637658
  • 9781236637659