Principles of Torts and Contracts; A Short Digest of the Common Law, Chiefly Founded Upon the Works of Addison. with Illustrative Cases ...

Principles of Torts and Contracts; A Short Digest of the Common Law, Chiefly Founded Upon the Works of Addison. with Illustrative Cases ...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1880 edition. Excerpt: ...benefit of his infant daughter 2 Held, that they were liable upon a bill drawn for the accommodation of the partnership, and paid in discharge of a partnership debt; although their names were not added to the firm, but the trade was carried on by the other partners under the same style as before, and the executors, when they divided the profits and loss of the trade, carried the same to the account of the infant, and took no part of the profits themselves. (8) See Alderson v. Pope, 1 Campb. 403, n. (4) Coope v. Eyre, 1 II. Bl. 37. A., B., C'. and I). entered into an agreement to purchase goods in the name of A. only, and to take aliquot shares of the purchase; but it did not appear that they agreed jointly to re-sell the goods. On failure of A. Held, that B., C. and D. were not answerable to the vendor as partners with A. A. and B., being joint owners of a racehorse, it was agreed between them that A. should keep and train and have the management of the horse, conveying him to, and entering him for, the different races; that 35s. per week should be allowed for his keep; and that the expenses of his keep, &, c., should be borne jointly by A. and B., and the horse's winnings equally divided between them. Held, that this did not constitute them partners in the horse, but that A. might recover from B. a moiety of the expense he had incurred, there having been no winnings, for this was in the nature of an advance of capital by A. to B. (5) Barton v. Hanson, 2 Taunt. 51. Where several persons unite together for the purpose of carrying on the business of common carriers of passengers and goods, and one finds the coach, and the others divide the road into districts, and each horses and conveys the coach through his own district, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 162 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 299g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236863356
  • 9781236863355