The Principles of Speech and Vocal Physiology; And Dictionary of Sounds, Embracing a Full Theoretical Development for the Guidance of Parents, Teachers, Public Speakers, &C.

The Principles of Speech and Vocal Physiology; And Dictionary of Sounds, Embracing a Full Theoretical Development for the Guidance of Parents, Teachers, Public Speakers, &C. : With Minute Practical Directions and Exercise for the Cure of

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ... is slightly less open, and of a deeper formation than in England, --the tongue being farther retracted towards its position for aw. This Scotch sound will be found separately noted in our General Vowel Scheme, (page 26). The open character of the English n (9) will be readily acquired, by simply opening the mouth well, and retracting the lips so as to uncover the edges of the teeth; and, when the vowel is followed by R, final or before another articulation, by guarding against any lingual vibration for the R. The Irish pronunciation of this element has, like the Scotch, a deeper formation than the English, --partaking more of the quality of aw; it will be Anglicised by the same means. We take occasion here to notice the peculiar French sound eu, which, in ignorance of its mechanism, is often so difiicult to the English mouth; and to bring it in contrast with the English u (9)--the formation of which is equally difficult to French organs. The 9th vowel is not heard in French: the nearest approach to it is the vowel en, as in jeune, penr, etc. Frenchmen do not, however, pronounce eu instead of u (9), but generally aw or o (10 or 11). They may with little difiiculty acquire the true sound of No. 9, when they compare its formation with that of their en. The French en is formed with the organs internally arranged as for the French e or the English No. 4, and externally as for aw (10); it is the compound, or Labio-lingual vowel corresponding to these simple Labial and Lingual Formations.' (Let the English student of French apply this theory, and he will at once produce the perfect French en. The simplest way to practise is to dwell on the sound of eh (4), and, while doing so, to contract the labial aperture to its ordinary shape for...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 76 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236773578
  • 9781236773579