Principles of Speech and Dictionary of Sounds; Including Directions and Exercises for the Cure of Stammering and Correction of All Faults of Articulation

Principles of Speech and Dictionary of Sounds; Including Directions and Exercises for the Cure of Stammering and Correction of All Faults of Articulation

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1916 edition. Excerpt: ..._ When the diphthong 7-I3 occurs before R, the triphthong 7-13-8 is formed as in our, sour, power, etc.; words the full utterance of which is dissyllabic; but colloquial-ly the middle element is often slurred over, or opened to Io or II to remove or lessen the dissyllabic effect. WORDS TO BE DISTINGUISHED IN PRONUNCIATION. how (of a ship) lower (to darken) slough (7-I3) bow (window) lower (adj.) slough (utf) sow (swine) wound (part.) sow (v.) wound (n.) WORDS OF THE SAME PRONUNCIATION BUT DIFFERENT ORTHOGRAPHY. bough our bow (salute) hour EIGHTH vowEL--as in err. This is a characteristically English vowel. Its position in the General Scheme (page 24) indicates its exact formation. It is intermediate to ah and the French sound eu; seeming to the attentive ear to partake of the quality of both sounds, and to be thus analogous to the tint produced by the amalgamation of two shades of colour. As the colour varies with the varying proportions of its elements, so this vowel, among different speakers and in different dialects, partakes in a greater or less degree of the ah or the eu. In London, it is often heard as open as ah (but this is a vulgarity), as in sarve for serve, sar for sir, etc., and, in some of the English provinces, it is pronounced almost identically with the French sound, as in saeur for sir, peur (feet) for per (fect), etc. The sound of this element differs but slightly from that of vowel 9 (up, urn ); but the difference, though not strongly marked, is clearly appreciable; and the distinction between such words as fur and fir, urn and earn, should always be The changes which take place in the organic arrangement for vowels of this open class are not all within reach of observation. The vocal passage is modified by the root of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 78 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236759192
  • 9781236759191