Principles and Practice of Hydrotherapy for Students and Practitioners of Medicine; Embodying a Consideration of the Scientific Basis, Technique and Therapeutics of Hydrotherapy and Some Allied Branches of Physiologic Therapy

Principles and Practice of Hydrotherapy for Students and Practitioners of Medicine; Embodying a Consideration of the Scientific Basis, Technique and Therapeutics of Hydrotherapy and Some Allied Branches of Physiologic Therapy

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 edition. Excerpt: ...powers. A pail pour or shower may be used to remove the salt and so combine it with other tonic measures. 6. Corn Doucms. This should be preceded by a warm or hot shower, or it may be given as a hot and cold douche consisting of three or four changes. The reaction is enhanced by the use of percussion. At first only a limited portion of the body should be treated in this manner, such as the feet and legs, later the spine and chest also. 7. WET SHEET RUB. The patient should stand in a tub of hot water. At first the sheet should be wrung nearly dry from cold water. This is wrapped about the patient in the manner directed under technique. The rubbing should be over the sheet until the skin is warm and then the patient quickly dried by means of sheets and towels. Later, colder water should be used and the sheet wrung less thoroughly. 8. DRIPPING SHEET RUB. When the patient' has acquired the ability to react to the wet sheet rub, the treatment may be increased in vigor by pouring over the shoulders while the patient is still wrapped in the sheet and after he has been warmed by rubbing, from one to three pails of cold water, at first using one containing cool water, and later two or three pails of colder water. After each pour, the rubbing should be renewed and continued until the patient is warm. 9. SHALLOW BATH. A full length tub should be partly filled withcold water. The patient then enters the tub, sitting upright while both patient and attendant rub the limbs and hips. The patient now reclines in the tub while he is again rubbed with'cold water, it being dashed up over the body during the course of the rubbing. The water should hardly more than half cover the body. The temperature of the shallow bath may be gradually decreased. 10....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 162 pages
  • 187.96 x 243.84 x 10.16mm | 317.51g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236867564
  • 9781236867568