The Principles of Physiology Applied to the Preservation of Health, and to the Improvement of Physical and Mental Education - By Andrew Combe

The Principles of Physiology Applied to the Preservation of Health, and to the Improvement of Physical and Mental Education - By Andrew Combe

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1848 edition. Excerpt: ...processes by which these changes are effected in the lungs. According to one view, the carbonic acid contained in expired air is formed by the secretion of carbon from the venous blood in its passage through the lungs, this immediately uniting with the oxygen of the air, and forming carbonic acid, in which shape it is then thrown out in expiration. According to the other view, the carbonic acid exists in, and is separated from, the venous blood in the state of acid, and the oxygen which disappears is absorbed into the circulating current. The former explanation was long almost universally received, but Dr. Edwards has lately advanced very strong grounds for adopting the latter. Whatever may be the true theory, all physiologists are agreed as to the fact that the arterialization of the blood in the lungs is essentially dependent on the supply of oxygen contained in the air which we breathe, and that air is fit or unfit for respiration in exact proportion as its quantity of oxygen approaches to, or differs from, that contained in pure air. If, consequently, we attempt to breathe nitrogen, hydrogen, or any other gas not containing oxygen, the result will be speedy suffocation: while if we breathe air containing a too high proportion of oxygen, the vital powers will speedily suffer from excess of stimulus. From oxygen being thus essential to life and respiration, it is often called vital air, in contradistinction to those gasses which are incapable of supporting life. We can now appreciate the importance of a due supply of fresh air wherever living beings are congregated. In man, the rate of vitiation produced by breathing, and the relative importance of ventilation, may easily be estimated. An individual is ascertained to breathe, on an...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 110 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123689524X
  • 9781236895240