The Principles of Painting; To Which Is Added, the Balance of Painters. Being the Names of the Most Noted Painters, and Their Degrees of Perfection in

The Principles of Painting; To Which Is Added, the Balance of Painters. Being the Names of the Most Noted Painters, and Their Degrees of Perfection in

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1743 edition. Excerpt: ... it often happens, in dry places, that the bark gathers a thinmoss, which makes it look quite yellow 5 so that, to make the bark of a tree apparent, the painter may suppose it to be light upon a dark ground, and dark on alight one. 144. Of-LAND-sink. Tu E observation of the difierent. barks merits' a particular-attention; for it will appear, that, in hard woods, age chaps them, and thereby gives them a sort of embroidery; and that, in proportion as they grow old, these chaps grow more deep. Any other accidents in barks may arise either from moisture, or driness, or green mofses, or white stains of several trees.. THE barks of white woods will-also afford much matter for prafitice, if their diverfity be duly fiudied: And this confideration leads me to say something of the fludy of landskip, which I will do according to my own notion of it, without pretending to prescribe my sentiments to others. Of tbe Study of THE study of landskip may be considered either with respecit to beginners, or to those who have made some advances in it. Bisc 1 N N E-R s will find, in pracftice, that the chief trouble of landikip lies in handling trees; and it is not only in pracftice methinks, but also in specnlation', that trees are the mofi: diflicult part of landskip, as they are its greatest ornament. But itis only proposed here, to give beginners an idea of trees in general, and to shew them how to express them well. It would be needless to point out to them the common efFeCts of trees and 5 ', OfLANDs1-LIP. t4.5 and plants, because they are obvious to every bne, yet there are some things, which, tho' not unknown, deserve out reflection. We know, for instance, that all trees 'require air, some more, some less, asuthe chief cause of their vegetation-and productions;...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 40 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236575717
  • 9781236575715