The Principles of Money Applied to the Present State of the Coin of Bengal; Being an Inquiry Into the Methods to Be Used for Correcting the Defects of

The Principles of Money Applied to the Present State of the Coin of Bengal; Being an Inquiry Into the Methods to Be Used for Correcting the Defects of

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1772 edition. Excerpt: ...value relatively to this current rupee. But whereas in times past contracts may have been made, and obligations entered into, according to the ancient proportion of the silver coins, including their battas in favour, or in deduction of their several values; and as the Company intend to preserve entire the interest of all parties bound in such contracts, It is therefore declared That all persons who have Contracted obligations to pay sums of money in sicca rupees, shall specifically pay the same at the rate of 116 current rupees, for every 100 sicca rupees, less or more for which they have been bound. That those who have contracted obligations to pay sums of money in sunat rupees, shall specifically pay the same at the rate of 111 current rupees, for every ioo sunat rupees, less or more for which they have been bound. That those who have contracted obligations to pay sums of money in duis massa rupees, or in such rupees as ought to carry the weight of one sicca, or 16 annas, annas, shall specifically pay the same at the rate of 110 current rupees, for every hundred duss massa rupees, less or more for which they have been bound. That those who have contracted obligations to pay sums of money in arcot rupees, shall specifically pay the same at the rate of 108 current rupees for every 1oo arcot rupees, less or more for which they have been bound. And, whereas it is impossible for coins to be made with such accuracy, both as to weight and fineness, as commerce and equal dealings between men require; and also, as it is impossible that the most exact coin can long circulate without its weight being impaired: And whereas the specific weight of the rupees of Bengal has at all times been considered to be one sicca weight of silver of r%%parts fine; it is...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 185.42 x 238.76 x 2.54mm | 68.04g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236658736
  • 9781236658739