The Principles of the Jesuits; Developed in a Collection of Extracts from Their Own Authors to Which Are Prefixed a Brief Account of the Origin of the Order and a Sketch of Its Institute

The Principles of the Jesuits; Developed in a Collection of Extracts from Their Own Authors to Which Are Prefixed a Brief Account of the Origin of the Order and a Sketch of Its Institute

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1839 edition. Excerpt: ...sins in themselves, nor the cause of sin, and therefore need not necessarily he confessed.68 68 " Intelligit confessarius, pcenitentem ignorantid invincibili, vel saltern non culpabili laborare, et nullum sperat fructum ex admonitione, sed potiils animi inquietudinem, rixas, vel scandala: an dissimulare debeat? Affirmat Suarius; quia cum admonitio nihil sit profutura, ignorantia pcenitentem excusabit a peccato."--Tr. VII. Sacram. Examen. IV. de Pwnitentifi, c.7. n. 155. 67 " Qui verd ex inveterata consuetudine inadvertenter jurat falsum, licet videatur obligari ad consuetudinem confitendam, tamen communiter excusatur."--Lib. ii. c. 3. 3. n. 23. GEORGE DE RHODES. Disputationum Theologice Scholasticce, Tomus Prior. Lugduni, 1671. Wherever there is no knowledge of wickedness, there is also, of necessity, no sin. It is sufficient to have at least a confused knowledge of the heinousness of a sin; without which knowledge there would never be a flagrant crime. For instance, one man kills another, believing it indeed to be wrong, but conceiving it to be nothing more than a trifling fault. Such a man does not greatly sin, because it is knowledge only which points out the wickedness or the grossness of it to the will. Therefore, criminality is only imputed according to the measure of knowledge.--(De Actions Humanis, Disp. 2. Qwest. 2. Sect. 1. 2.) If a man commit adultery or homicide, reflecting, indeed, but still very imperfectly and superficially, upon the wickedness and great sinfulness of these crimes; however heinous may be the matter, he still sins but slightly. The reason is, that as a knowledge of the wickedness is necessary to constitute the sin, so is a full, clear knowledge and reflection necessary to constitute...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 64 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 132g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236527542
  • 9781236527547