Principles of Geology; Or, the Modern Changes of the Earth and Its Inhabitants Considered as Illustrative of Geology Volume . 2

Principles of Geology; Or, the Modern Changes of the Earth and Its Inhabitants Considered as Illustrative of Geology Volume . 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1868 edition. Excerpt: ...the abodes of distinct species of animals and plants, we must look back to the times of Bulfon and see in what crude conjectures even so great a naturalist as his illustrious contemporary Linnaeus indulged, when speculating on the manner in which the earth may first have become peopled with its present inhabitants. The habitable world was imagined by the Swedish philosopher to have been for a certain time limited to one small tract, the only portion of the earth's surface that was as yet laid bare by the subsidence of the primmval ocean. In this fertile spot the originals of all the species of plants which exist on this globe were congregated together with the first ancestors of all animals and of the human race. ' In qua commode habitaverint animalia omnia, et vegetabilia laete germinaverint.' In order to accommodate the various habits of so many creatures, and to provide a diversity of climate suited to their several natures, the tract in which the creation took place was supposed to have been situated in some warm region of the earth, but to have contained a lofty mountain range, on the heights and in the declivities of which were to be found all temperatures and every climate, from that of the torrid to that of the frozen zone.t There are still perhaps some geologists who adhere to a notion once very popular, that there are signs of a universal ocean at a remote period after the planet had become the abode of living creatures. But few will now deny that the proportion of sea and land approached very nearly to that now established long before the present species of plants and animals had come into being. The reader must bear in mind that the language of Buffon, Buffon, vol. v. 1755.--On the Vir-also Prichard, Phys. Hist. of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 110 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236498860
  • 9781236498861