Principles of Geology; Being an Attempt to Explain the Former Changes of the Earth's Surface by Reference to Causes Now in Operation Volume 3

Principles of Geology; Being an Attempt to Explain the Former Changes of the Earth's Surface by Reference to Causes Now in Operation Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1833 edition. Excerpt: ...bears testimony to considerable local disturbance subsequent to the deposition of the marls, but such inclined and vertical strata are very rare. 4. Limestone, travertin, 8rc.--Both the preceding members of the lacustrine deposit, the marls and grits, pass occasionally into limestone. Sometimes only concretionary nodules abound in them; but these, by an additional quantity of calcareous matter, unite, as already noticed (p. 229), into regular beds. On each side of the basin of the Limagne, both on the east at Gannat, and on the west at Vichy, a white oolitic limestone is quarried. At Vichy, the oolite resembles our Bath stone in appearance and beauty, and, like it, is soft when first taken from the quarry, but soon hardens on exposure to the air. At Gannat, the stone contains land-shells and bones of quadrupeds, resembling those of the Paris gypsum. In several places in the neighbourhood of Gannat, at Marculot among others, this stone is divided by layers of clay. At Chadrat, in the hill of La Serre, the limestone is pisolitic, and in this and other respects resembles the travertin of Tivoli. It presents the same combination, of a radiated and concentric structure, and the coats of the different segments of spheroids have the same undulating surface. (See wood-cut No. 5, chap, xii. vol. i.) Indusial limestone.--There is another remarkable form of fresh-water limestone in Auvergne, called ' indusial, ' from the cases, or indusice, of the larvae of Phryganea, great heaps of which have been encrusted, as they lay, by hard travertin, and formed into a rock. We may often see, in our ponds, some of the living species of these insects, covered with small fresh-water shells, which they have the power of fixing to the outside of their tubular cases, in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 168 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 313g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236598652
  • 9781236598653