Principles of Generative Phonology

Principles of Generative Phonology : An introduction

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Description

Principles of Generative Phonology is a basic, thorough introduction to phonological theory and practice. It aims to provide a firm foundation in the theory of distinctive features, phonological rules and rule ordering, which is essential to be able to appreciate recent developments and discussions in phonological theory. Chapter 1 is a review of phonetics; chapter 2 discusses contrast and distribution, with emphasis on rules as the mechanism for describing distributions; chapter 3 introduces distinctive features, natural classes, and redundancy; chapter 4 builds on the concept of rules and shows how these can account for alternations; chapter 5 demonstrates the use of rule ordering; chapter 6 discusses abstractness and underlying representations; chapter 7 discusses post-SPE developments, serving as a prelude to more advanced texts. Each chapter includes exercises to guide the student in the application of the principles introduced in that chapter and to encourage thinking about theoretical issues. The text has been classroom tested.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 336 pages
  • 149.9 x 221 x 20.3mm | 453.6g
  • John Benjamins Publishing Co
  • Benjamins (John) North America Inc.,US
  • Netherlands
  • English
  • 1588115623
  • 9781588115621

Table of contents

1. Preface; 2. 1. Phonetics; 3. 1.1 Articulatory phonetics; 4. 1.1.1 Consonants; 5. 1.1.2 Vowels; 6. 1.1.3 Suprasegmentals; 7. 1.1.4 Broad and narrow transcription; 8. 1.2 Acoustic phonetics; 9. 1.3 Phonetic alphabets; 10. 1.3.1 The IPA; 11. 1.3.2 Problems with the IPA; 12. 1.3.3 Compromise adopted in this book; 13. 1.4 Exercises; 14. 2. Contrast and Distribution; 15. 2.1 Complementary distribution; 16. 2.2 Coincident distribution; 17. 2.3 Overlapping distribution; 18. 2.4 Pattern congruity; 19. 2.5 Free variation; 20. 2.6 Phonological rules and notations; 21. 2.7 Common types of phonological processes; 22. 2.7.1 Assimilation; 23. 2.7.2 Dissimilation; 24. 2.7.3 Lenition; 25. 2.7.4 Fortition; 26. 2.7.5 Insertions; 27. 2.7.6 Deletions; 28. 2.7.7 Lengthening; 29. 2.7.8 Compensatory lengthening; 30. 2.7.9 Shortening; 31. 2.8 Problems with phonemic analysis; 32. 2.8.1 Neutralization; 33. 2.8.2 Pattern congruity; 34. 2.9 Summary; 35. 2.10 Exercises; 36. 3. Distinctive features; 37. 3.1 Features as smallest building blocks; 38. 3.2 Binary distinctions; 39. 3.3 Further vowel features; 40. 3.4 Major classes: major class features; 41. 3.5 Features of consonants; 42. 3.5.1 Voicing and aspiration; 43. 3.5.2 Manner of articulation; 44. 3.5.3 Place of articulation; 45. 3.6 Secondary articulation of consonants; 46. 3.7 Features for suprasegmentals; 47. 3.8 Redundancy and implications; 48. 3.9 Exercises; 49. 4. Alternations; 50. 4.1 Alternations as phonology; 51. 4.2 Morphology; 52. 4.3 Russian devoicing; 53. 4.4 More on phonological rules; 54. 4.5 ATR harmony; 55. 4.6 Spanish lenition; Fortition and nasal assimilation in Lumasaaba; 56. 4.7 Steps in phonological analysis; 57. 4.8 Writing up the analysis; 58. 4.9 Further rule writing conventions and abbreviatory devices; 59. 4.9.1 Curly braces; 60. 4.9.2 Parentheses; 61. 4.9.3 Greek letter variables; 62. 4.9.4 Angled bracket notation; 63. 4.9.5 Mirror image rules; 64. 4.9.6 Transformational rules; 65. 4.10 Exercises; 66. 5. Rule order; 67. 5.1 Russian; 68. 5.2 Methodology: discovering rule order; 69. 5.3 Formulation of the ordered rule hypothesis; 70. 5.4 Iterative rules; 71. 5.5 Spanish r-sounds; 72. 5.6 Yawelmani; 73. 5.6.1 Vowel Shortening and Epenthesis; 74. 5.6.2 Vowel Harmony; 75. 5.6.3 Some additional rules; 76. 5.7 Rule ordering relationships; 77. 5.7.1 Feeding order; 78. 5.7.2 Bleeding order; 79. 5.7.3 Counterfeeding order; 80. 5.7.4 Counterbleeding order; 81. 5.7.5 Mutually bleeding order; 82. 5.7.6 Opacity; 83. 5.8 Exercises; 84. 6. Abstractness; 85. 6.1 Phonetic representations; 86. 6.2 The null hypothesis; 87. 6.3 Two levels of representation; 88. 6.4 The simplicity criterion; 89. 6.5 The naturalness condition; 90. 6.6 Degrees of abstractness in underlying representations; 91. 6.6.1 Concrete underlying representations; 92. 6.6.2 Underlying representation as one of the phonetic alternants; 93. 6.6.3 Morphemes with several alternations; 94. 6.6.4 More abstract underlying representations; 95. 6.6.5 Limits on abstractness; 96. 6.7 Corpus-external evidence; 97. 6.7.1 Speech errors; 98. 6.7.2 Second language acquisition; 99. 6.7.3 Writing systems; 100. 6.7.4 Language games; 101. 6.7.5 Poetry; 102. 6.7.6 Language change; 103. 6.7.7 Maori; 104. 6.8 Exercises; 105. 7. Multilinear phonology; 106. 7.1 Autosegmental phonology; 107. 7.1.1 Tone; 108. 7.1.2 Vowel harmony; 109. 7.1.3 Stability; 110. 7.2 Metrical and prosodic phonology; 111. 7.2.1 Metrical syllable structure; 112. 7.2.2 Metrical stress; 113. 7.2.3 Higher metrical units; 114. 7.3 Underspecification; 115. 7.4 Lexical phonology; 116. 7.5 Exercises; 117. References; 118. Indexshow more

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