Principles of Breeding; A Treatise on Thremmatology or the Principles and Practices Involved in the Economic Improvement of Domesticated Animals and Plants

Principles of Breeding; A Treatise on Thremmatology or the Principles and Practices Involved in the Economic Improvement of Domesticated Animals and Plants

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1907 edition. Excerpt: ...fruit as in the field of practical affairs. In general evolution it does not matter greatly whether acquired (?) characters are inherited much or little, or not at all; the discussion is there largely an academic question. But in the fields and yards of the farmer it is the largest of all questions, and we are led to inquire sharply whether these distinctions are real; whether the differences between germinal (blastogenic) and acquired (somatogenic) characters are differences in kind or in degree; whether, in short, acquired characters, in the common acceptation of the term and in any true sense, exist at all. The characters of the individual are the characters of the race. Careful observation will disclose the fact that every quality inherited or acquired by an adult individual is possessed in some degree by every other normal adult individual of the same race. All horses can trot some; all cows give some milk; all sheep bear wool of some color, length, or degree of fineness; all hens have feathers; all men not idiotic can learn and speak a language; all men have some little (perhaps very little) musical ability, and all can learn to play the piano or the violin. The point here is not whether it is skillfully done, but whether it can be done at all. It is a habit of speech to designate a low degree of quality by negative terms, and we say of the horse that trots but slowly or awkwardly that he "cannot trot." We mean by that that he cannot trot well enough to make him valuable for this purpose. In the same way the man who "cannot sing" is the one whose singing we do not care to hear; the man who "cannot speak" is the one on whom we would not depend for the presentation of a difficult case. We do not mean of him that, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 248 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 449g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236563743
  • 9781236563743