Price's Carpet and Rug News; Published Once a Month (Except April and October When Semi-Monthly) in the Interest of the Floor Covering Industry Volume 3-4

Price's Carpet and Rug News; Published Once a Month (Except April and October When Semi-Monthly) in the Interest of the Floor Covering Industry Volume 3-4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ...is wound from the bobbins onto the printing drum by young women who are called "fillers." They first cover the drum with a sheet of table oil cloth. This is done to prevent any loose coloring matter from getting on the face of the drum during the printing process, which might get mixed with other coloring matters used in subsequent printing. Before printing. the filler places the full bobbin of yarn on the slide carriage and then takes a piece of yarn (usually doubled in three), carries it across the width of the drum and fastens it securely at each end. The ends of the threads from each of the bobbins are now tied to the thick yarn at equal distances apart across the width of the drum, which is then set in motion and continues to revolve by power until the required length of material has been wound upon it. This is shown by the clock dial already mentioned. The sliding carriage travels with the threads (usually six in number) until the space between the threads is covered with yarn., Ifless than a full drum be required, then by using five, four, three. two, one bobbins the width of the drum covered would respectively be five-sixths, two-thirds, onehalf, one-third. one-sixth. The filler then divides the number of threads which are around the drum into six divisions. each containing about 196 threads-a number which corresponds with the numerical revolutions of the drum and also with the number of bobbins used. Each of these divisions is tied separately and is called a hank. A lesser or greater number of threads and length of hank can be made if desired, but it must be understood that the whole length of the yarn or the drum represents one pile thread only. There are several methods used for distributing the yarn evenly over the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 266 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 481g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236955463
  • 9781236955463