Present Concerns (Redesigns) P

Present Concerns (Redesigns) P

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Description

Although C.S. Lewis professed never to read newspapers and recommended doses of good literature as an antidote to news, he himself was an occasional journalist. All but two of the nineteen essays in this volume, previously uncollected, first appeared in newspapers or magazines. They have in common Lewis's characteristic sanity and persuasiveness. Those written between 1940 and 1945 reflect largely on questions generated by the war: democratic values, the need for an updated chivarly, and the cynicism of the modern soldier. Other essays examine the threats to educational and spiritual fulfillment; while "Sex in Literature" and "On Living in the Atomic Age" address literary censorship and our very survival, issues debated even more passionately today than in Lewis's lifetime.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 112 pages
  • 142.24 x 198.12 x 10.16mm | 113.4g
  • United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 0156027852
  • 9780156027854
  • 480,377

Back cover copy

Where God gives the gift, the foolishness of preaching is still mighty. But best of all is a team of two: one to deliver the preliminary intellectual barrage, and the other to follow up with a direct attack on the heart.
An inveterate scholar, throughout his lifetime C.S. Lewis wrote on any number of topics. While his most famous essays concern his thoughts on Christianity, he was also interested in literature, masculinity, domestic life, and war. In the nineteen essays collected in Present Concerns, he touches on all of these and more. Though wide-ranging, these essays all share one thing: C.S. Lewis s characteristic pragmatism and persuasiveness. Many of the essays included were written between 1940 and 1945, and so pertinently reflect on the issues raised by World War II: democratic values, the need for a new chivalry, and the cynicism of the modern soldier, all of which remain relevant today.
"Lewis gives us permission to admit our own doubts, our own angers and anguishes, and to know that they are part of the soul's growth." Madeleine L'Engle
"
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Rating details

296 ratings
4.06 out of 5 stars
5 33% (98)
4 44% (131)
3 20% (58)
2 2% (7)
1 1% (2)
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