Presbyterian Prejudice Display'd; Or an Answer to Mr. Benjamin Bennet's Memorial of the Reformation. by a Hearty Well-Wisher to the Established Church

Presbyterian Prejudice Display'd; Or an Answer to Mr. Benjamin Bennet's Memorial of the Reformation. by a Hearty Well-Wisher to the Established Church

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1722 edition. Excerpt: ... it was in vain fpr them to think of less than Twelve, in regard he G 2-' knew (s) Nalson'jO'/fct.Vol.1. /. a9z. (d) NaJsorrV ColleB.Wol i.p. 5421 (a) PjgilaleV Short Vim of the late Troubles Ir England, f. 61. OiUan'j list. of R&jvlwmi in England, . $w 'knew under that Number would not be accepted, which they absolutely refus'd, and the King dissolved I t, hem. The Iris J Massacre is what I shall consider next, of which like the rest of his Brethren fe givejnot the most impartial Account. He tells, Us; 261. That tie Rebels pretend a Gomrniflum from the King, and 'tis certain they Had his broad Seal, hcroo they canie by it, is the Question; 'tis commonly said, they had it from Farnham Abbey. (It should be Cbarlemont Castle, tho' Mr. Collier in his Historical Dictionary, fays, Tarnham Abbey) from an old Writing, and fixed it to a Commiffiohthey shewed. It is very basic, but withal very Unjust in this Gentleman to flourish over this Cause in the manner he has done, by keeping in the dark every thing that opposes, what he offers for the Proof" of ic. For certainly this cannot with any propriety be called the Writing a History, when a Man makes himself a Parry, (is he all along does) and hath certainly something in View, besides the Truth of Historical Facts; and so long as Men take si?ch Liberties in writing History, there will be little or no Difference between an Historian, and a Knight of the Post. If every little omission wilt reflect upon the Truth of a Story, and the Sincerity of an Historian: nay, more then ttiat render it deceirful, and berray the Reader into Errors, and Mistakes, what must the Consequence be of leaving out the Principal Branches of a Stoiy, and those the Truest? 'Tis plain our Historian has given us but what has been...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236520378
  • 9781236520371