Preliminary Part of Paper Against Gold; The Main Object of Which Is to Show the Justice and Necessity of Reducing the Interest of That Which Is Called the National Debt

Preliminary Part of Paper Against Gold; The Main Object of Which Is to Show the Justice and Necessity of Reducing the Interest of That Which Is Called the National Debt

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1821 edition. Excerpt: ... in fact, to preserve themselves from instant ruin. Similar Resolutions were passed in the country, where the Quarter Sessions happening to be then taking place, the Resolutions were sent forth from the Bench, with, of course, something of a magisterial weight and MANSION-HOUSE, LONDON.--February 27, 1797.--At a meeting of Merchants, Bankers, &c. held here this day, to consider Of the steps which it may be proper to take, to prevent Embarrassments t- Public Credit, from the effects of any illfounded or exaggerated Alarms, and to support it with the utmost exertions at the present important conjuncture--The Lord Mayor in the Chair;--Resolved UnaniMously, --.That we, the nndersigned, being highly sensible how necessary the preservation of 'Public Credit is at this time, do most readily hereby declare, that we will not refuse to receive Bank Notes in payment of any sum of money to be paid to us; and we will use our utmost endeavours to make all our payments in the same manner.--Bkook Watson. The resolution lies for signing at the following places; London Tavern, BishopsgateStreeti Crown and Anchor Tavern, Strand St. Albans Tavern, St. Alban's Street; Three.Crown Coffee-House, in Three-Crown Comt, Borough; and at Lloyd's Coffeehouse. authority, as will be seen in the instance of the magistrates of Surrey, who, with Lords Grant Icy and Onslow at their head, appear to have led the way. The Privy Council (pray read their names all over) had also a meeting upon the subject, and it was quite curious to see the Judges and great pensioners, and even the Ministers themselves, not excepting the Lord High Treasurer, publishing their promises to receive and to pay bank-notes, and, as far as depended on them individually, to support the circulation of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 176 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 327g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236490126
  • 9781236490124