The Prehistoric Men of Kentucky; A History of What Is Known of Their Lives and Habits, Together with a Description of Their Implements and Other Relics and of the Tumuli Which Have Earned for Them the Designation of Mound Volume 25

The Prehistoric Men of Kentucky; A History of What Is Known of Their Lives and Habits, Together with a Description of Their Implements and Other Relics and of the Tumuli Which Have Earned for Them the Designation of Mound Volume 25

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1910 edition. Excerpt: ...resemblance to what is called a rolling-pin; the longest of which the writer has observed in Kentucky measures seventeen inches in length by three inches in diameter. (See page 104.) These pestles of cylindrical form are rare in this State. The other forms would be used probably fifty times where the long cylinder was used once. These cylindrical types now and then are discovered of very small size, not more than three or four inches in length and half an inch to an inch in diameter. It has been suggested, with some show of reason, that these were probably used by the tribal doctor in compounding herbs which constituted the drug supply. Here and there are found pestles made of rare stone and polished with great care and skill. The usage to which this class of implements was applied is not a matter of dispute among those who are interested in archeology. Every one concedes that they were pestles and were very commonly used. The wearing away of the lower end, which is so often observed, could have been done by no other process than by grinding or pounding. Many show great economy in prehistoric domestic life. They have been worn to such small proportions that the object is but a fraction of its former size. MORTARS. When the pestle came into general use the mortar of necessity followed. If there was something to grind there must be something upon which the grinding could be done. This was undoubtedly in the early stages of prehistoric domestic life merely a flat stone. As soon as the prehistoric man realized the advantage of a pestle with broadened base, yet so formed as to enable the holder to grasp it firmly, he realized the necessity of an improved surface upon which the matter to be ground could be placed. He soon learned that a rounded...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 66 pages
  • 188.98 x 246.13 x 3.56mm | 136.08g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236883667
  • 9781236883667