Practice of the Court of Referees on Private Bills in Parliament; With Reports of Cases as to the Locus Standi of Petitioners During the Sessions 1867-[72] ...

Practice of the Court of Referees on Private Bills in Parliament; With Reports of Cases as to the Locus Standi of Petitioners During the Sessions 1867-[72] ...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1870 edition. Excerpt: ...Wye Railway and Canal Company; and that the petitioners apprehend that the bill, if passed, will be used hereafter for the pgrpose of diverting over the Great VVestern iway the whole of the coal trnfiic which now reaches the petitioners through the Lydney Basin. The promoters seem to lay great stress on the point of distance; but it is really beside the question. If petitioners were only a uarter of an inch from the works contemplata by a particular bill, they might have no locus slandi; whilst in works at a distance of fifty miles they might have the strongest interest. Our case is that we are inseparably bound u with the prosperity of the district, and wit the incidental facilities of water su ply. The powers sou ht as to sale and exc ango of land at Ly ney can only be with the object of putting down rails and using the land for the purpose of a junction. This must affect the traffic; and we claim a right to be heard accordingly. Granville Sonuwsetz There is no possible principle on which the Court can grant a locus stamli in this case. From their own petition it does not appear that one of the petitioners deals with our port at Lydney. Mr. RICKARDS: They have some barge-owners among them? Somerset: Yes, but they do not state that they send a single barge to our port. Even if they had done so, would they have any more ri ht to object to the tolls at Lydney than any ot er barge-owners in the kingdom? Let us test this. Fifteen miles u ) the Severn there is a canal, along the course 0 which certain mills have been built. That canal (the Stroudwater) joins another (the Thames and Severn); if the Stroudwater can be heard, the Thames and Severn can be heard also. But the Thames and Severn Canal joins the Thames; and, giving effect to the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 230 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 417g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236894871
  • 9781236894878