A Practical View of the Prevailing Religious System of Professed Christians, in the Higher And-Middle Classes in This Country, Contrasted with Real Christianity

A Practical View of the Prevailing Religious System of Professed Christians, in the Higher And-Middle Classes in This Country, Contrasted with Real Christianity

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1798 edition. Excerpt: ...God," and of the comparative worthlessness of all earthly estimation and pre-eminence. In truth, unless the affections of the foul be thus predominantly engaged on the side of heavenly, in preference to that of human honour, though we may have relinquished the pur suit of fame, we shall not have acquired that firm contexture of mind, which can beaf disgrace and shame without yielding to the pressure. Between these two states there is a wide interval, and he who, on a sober review of his conduct and motives, finds reason to believe he has arrived at the one, must not therefore conclude he has reached the other. To the one, a little natural moderation and quietness of temper may be sufficient to conduct us: but to the other, we can only attain by much discipline and flow advances; and when we think we have made great way, we shall often find reason to confess in the hour of trial, that we had greatly, far too greatly, over-rated our progress. When engaged too in the prosecution of this course, we must be aware of the snares which lie in our way, and of the deceits to which we are liable: and we must be provided against these impositions, by having obtained a full and distinct conception of the temper of mind with regard to human favour, which is prescribed to us in Scripture; and by continually examining our hearts and lives, to ascertain how far they correspond with it. This will prevent our substituting contemplation in the place of. ac tion, and giving ourselves too much up to those religious meditations which were formerly recommended, in which we must not indulge to the neglect of the common duties of life: this will prevent our mistaking the gratification of an indolent temper for the Christian's disregard of fame; for, never let...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 108 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 209g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236573366
  • 9781236573360