A Practical Treatise on Sub-Aqueous Foundations, Including the Coffer-Dam Process for Piers, and Dredges and Dredging; With Numerous Practical Examples from Actual Work

A Practical Treatise on Sub-Aqueous Foundations, Including the Coffer-Dam Process for Piers, and Dredges and Dredging; With Numerous Practical Examples from Actual Work

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 edition. Excerpt: ...The method of working the quarry, as may be seen from the illustrations, is of two distinct types, one portion of the quarry, Fig. 332, being worked on a bench about 20 feet above the water with guy derricks and gravity cars for handling the rock, while the other portion, Fig. 333, is worked from the water level by means of derrick scows, the cost of operating the latter being less than onehalf the cost of that portion on the bench. For example, taking corresponding minimum costs, the rock handled by the floating derricks costs approximately: For drilling and blasting, 5 cents per cubic yard; mucking, 6 cents per cubic yard; breaking up and loading, 14 cents per cubic yard, or a total of 25 cents per cubic yard; while in the other portion drilling and blasting costs approximately 8 cents per cubic yard; mucking, 18 cents per cubic yard; and breaking up and loading, 35 cents per cubic yard, or a total of 56 cents per cubic yard. In both instances the coal, powder, and incidentals rverage about the same, or 12 cents per cubic yard in addition to 1 e above. Quarry No. i is operated by drilling deep top holes from (i to 30 feet in depth with churn drills, and after springing with Ivnamite, these holes are fired with black powder, each shot bringing down from 3 to 7 yards of rock per pound of powder. In uking out the bottom bench along the face, air burleys are used to put in lifting shots, thus cleaning out the toe as the work progresses. The medium-sized rock is broken up by use of steel gads (Fig. 334) and sledges, and the larger pieces are drilled with air-plug drills and Broken up with small charges of dynamite ranging from one-fourth uf a stick to a whole stick for each hole. The rock is then loaded ato skips, which are swung around onto cars by...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 236 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 426g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236614143
  • 9781236614148