Practical Treatise on Limes, Hydraulic Cements, and Mortars; Containing Reports of Numerous Experiments Conducted in New York City, During the Years 1858 to 1861, Inclusive

Practical Treatise on Limes, Hydraulic Cements, and Mortars; Containing Reports of Numerous Experiments Conducted in New York City, During the Years 1858 to 1861, Inclusive

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1872 edition. Excerpt: ... will often make running the mill an economy, when it would not be so, were only the mortar for masons made there. It will hardly be found an economy, to run the mill for less than twenty to twenty-five batches a day. The mortar made in this mill is very much better than that made by baud from the material found at Key Quality of mill-"West, as the coarse calcareous sand requires made mortar.' - pulverization to make the mortar work well. It is what the masons call " woolly," when made by hand, and requires a much larger dose of cement or lime, to work properly under the trowel. The brick-work joints with mill-made mortar are observably thinner than with the hand-made mortar, thus giving a saving of mortar per cubic yard. The gain by using the mill, is rather in the superior qual These turnings are described in the third step of the method of manipulation practised at Forts Richmond and Tompkins, New York. (Paragraph 3G9.J ity and saving of quantity of the mortar, than Advantage of in the cost of mixing, though, when large oper-miU atives are steadily maintained, there is a great gain under this head, when circumstances favor its easy distribution. Ordinarily, a batch needs to be ground not _, .... J' o Time required in less than seven minutes, and not beyond fifteen making mortar c. i i i-i with the mill. minutes from the time the lime paste is put in the pan. If the grinding be carried much beyond this time, the mortar is decidedly impaired, and sets very slowly. This is ascribed, in part, by Major Hunt to the extreme pulverization of the calcareous sand, whereby the void spaces are made all small and nearly uniform, and partly to the incessant breaking up of the incipient setting by long continued grinding." Fig. 36....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 112 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236614518
  • 9781236614513