A Practical Treatise on Animal and Vegetable Fats and Oils; Comprising Both Fixed and Volatile Oils as Well as the Manufacture of Artificial Butter and Lubricants, Etc., with Lists of American Patents Relating to the Volume 1

A Practical Treatise on Animal and Vegetable Fats and Oils; Comprising Both Fixed and Volatile Oils as Well as the Manufacture of Artificial Butter and Lubricants, Etc., with Lists of American Patents Relating to the Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1896 edition. Excerpt: ...the water from the oil press flows back through the pipe H and the open valve B to the discharge pipe G. Now, suppose, by a mistake, the position of the valve were incorrect, and the stroke of the counter press not limited, there would be danger of the breaking of the connecting rods of the cam and of those of the press. To prevent this a safety-valve, Fig. 124, is provided. It is placed in a shoulder of the cylinder of the counter press. In the shoulder is a bore hole B, with another bore hole C vertical to B. B is closed as far C by a screw, while the valve D is placed in the bore hole C. The valve D is pressed upon its seat by the weighted lever E. A bent arm is connected with one of the connecting rods. By a progressive movement of F the bent part of G lifts the lever E by being pushed against it, whereby the valve is raised SECTION THROUGH THE SAFETY-VALVE. A, cylinder of the counter press B; B, C, bore holes; D, valve; E, lever with weight; F, connecting rod. by the water pressure prevailing in the cylinder A, so that the press water is discharged before the ram of the counter press has reached the end of its stroke. Continuous oil presses.--The first continuous oil press was constructed in 1856, by Bessemer & Heywood, of London, but for some reason or another was not introduced in practice. In 1883, F. Muller, of Esslingen, patented a similar press, based upon the same principle. The seed-meal falls continuously through a hopper into a horizontal pipe in which a piston moves backward and forward. By the forward stroke of the piston the seed-meal is forced into a perforated horizontal pipe of somewhat larger cross-section than the first pipe, while by the back stroke more seed-meal is introduced, the process being repeated until...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 142 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 268g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236634802
  • 9781236634801