Practical Plant Physiology; An Introduction to Original Research for Students and Teachers of Natural Science, Medicine, Agriculture, and Forestry

Practical Plant Physiology; An Introduction to Original Research for Students and Teachers of Natural Science, Medicine, Agriculture, and Forestry

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 edition. Excerpt: ...graphically. Fig. 99 shows that seedlings of Lupinus (four or five days old) always produce much less CO2 in intramolecular respiration than in normal respiration. The optimum temperature for both kinds of respiration lies at 40 C. Intramolecular respiration takes place even when plants are introduced into a vacuum. This latter result, first determined by Amm, was confirmed by Chudiakow (Landwirthschl. Jahrbiicher, Bd. 23). He disputes, however, the accuracy of some conclusions of Amm and myself. We had found that the ratio 1%, is not the same at all temperatures, and this statement Ghudiakow, on the ground of the results of his investigations, controverts. His work, however, is not, to my mind, conclusive, and further researches are necessary to settle the matter. Experiments in vacuo, which I, for example, made with pea seedlings after Wortmann's method are carried out as follows: --A thick glass tube, fused up at one end, and about 100 cm. long and 1'5 cm. in diameter, is filled with clean and perfectly dry mercury. As to the method of cleansing mercury, see 13. To prevent bubbles of air from adhering to the walls of the tube in filling it, it is best to run the mercury, by means of afunnel rather finely drawn out at the end, through a thin glass tube reaching to the bottom of the tube to be filled. When the tube has been filled, it is closed, and inverted in a flat glass vessel partially filled with mercury. We now have before us a barometer with a fairly large Torricellian vacuum. A few seedlings, developed in moist sawdust, are freed from the seed-coats, dried with blotting-paper, and passed up through the mercury of the barometer tube, together with a little ball of blotting-paper soaked in boiled-out water, which serves to..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 198 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 363g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236909399
  • 9781236909398