Practical Pharmaceutical Chemistry; An Explanation of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Processes, with the Methods of Testing the Purity of the Preparations. Deduced from Original Experiments

Practical Pharmaceutical Chemistry; An Explanation of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Processes, with the Methods of Testing the Purity of the Preparations. Deduced from Original Experiments

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1853 edition. Excerpt: ...on account of the carbon in the iron), and the gas must be entirely absorbed by a solution of acetate of lead; if this is not the case the gas will contain free hydrogen. Preparation.--In a copper or iron still which must be only half-filled, there are put 50 parts of chloride of lime, 100 parts of water, and 3 parts of alcohol of 90 per ct.; all are well stirred together, and the head luted on; with the still is connected a well cooled worm to which is attached a glass receiver, but not air tight, and the still then heated. So soon as the first portion begins to distil all the fire is withdrawn from the furnace, and if the distillation proceeds too rapidly, the head of the still must be cooled with wet cloths. When the product ceases to come over in a continuous stream, the fire is again added; the receiver is to be withdrawn as soon as it contains 8 parts. If the distillate reddens or bleaches blue litmus paper, which is however not generally the case, it is treated with small portions of hydrate of lime and poured into a narrow high cylindrical glass, and when it has separated into two layers of liquid, the upper portion is removed by means of a syphon, or pipette, whilst the under portion is treated with half its weight of powdered anhydrous chloride of calcium, and distilled with a gentle heat to dryness; the distillate to be kept in a well stopped bottle and cool place. The yield will be 2 or 21 parts. Recapitulation.--The chloride of lime consists of a mixture of about 50 per ct. hydrate of lime=CaO + HO, 22 per ct. chloride of calcium= CaCl and 28 per ct. of hypochlorite of lime=CaO + ClO; which corresponds to 4 at. hydrate of lime, 1 at. chloride of calcium and 1 at. hypochlorite of lime.. These proportions vary in the commercial...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 166 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 308g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236920929
  • 9781236920928