A Practical Grammar of the Turkish Language (as Spoken and Written); With Exercises for Translation Into Turkish, Quotations from Turkish Authors Illustrating Turkish Syntax and Composition, and Such Rules of the Arabic and Persian

A Practical Grammar of the Turkish Language (as Spoken and Written); With Exercises for Translation Into Turkish, Quotations from Turkish Authors Illustrating Turkish Syntax and Composition, and Such Rules of the Arabic and Persian

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1880 edition. Excerpt: ...it? Two years and a-half. Then (0-A euilt issf) you must speak it very well. I should have learnt it very well, if I id studied properly. Laziness is a bad thing. 3. The Persian Participles. 421. Persian infinitives are not used in Turkish, but Persian present or active participles, and past or passive participles, frequently are, especially in the formation of compound words; and they are sometimes used as nouns. Example: --darendt, holding, who holds; a bearer, holder, possessor (of a letter, &c.) aytndc, coming, who comes, future revendt, going, who goe khancndc, singing, reading; a singer, reader khah, desiring, wishing khair-khah, a well-wisher Jj bed-khah, an evil-wisher. khande, called, invited j J didi, teen umour didf, who has seen business, experienced shiketftf, broken o /, / thikfftU, heart-broken ti'jiima, showing rahnuma, showing the road, a guide gtiir, taking, holding, conquering jihan-ghir, world-conquering l'ii:, playing, risking janla;, who risks his life; an acrobat, a hone-breaker, horse-dealer. 422. The Persian active participles are either regular or irregular. The regular active participles are divided into two classes, those which end in j, and those which end with any other letter. 423. The passive of a regular active participle ending in J is formed by removing that letter, and putting in its stead. Example, jf touz (burning), t- soukhtt (burnt). (This word is also used as a noun, meaning one whose heart is inflamed with the love of God or science. Hence it also signifies a student of law and divinity.) jL s&z (making, fabricating), &Li sakhtt (made, fabricated, spurious, forged). Hence the Turkish word j te.-i sakhti-kiar (a forger). 424. The passive of the regular...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 50 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236853814
  • 9781236853813