Practical Carpentry with Steel Square Supplement; Being a Guide to the Correct Working and Laying Out of All Kinds of Carpenters' and Joiners' Work ... to Which Is Prefixed a Thorough Treatise on "Carpenters' Geometry

Practical Carpentry with Steel Square Supplement; Being a Guide to the Correct Working and Laying Out of All Kinds of Carpenters' and Joiners' Work ... to Which Is Prefixed a Thorough Treatise on "Carpenters' Geometry

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1916 edition. Excerpt: ...each line of the sketch mark the dimensions of the side of the figure it represents. Then, in describing the figure, either to its full dimensions, 0r-to any proportionate scale, draw any straight line as AB, N o. 2 and make it equal to the dimension marked on the corresponding line A B of the sketch No.1. From the centre A and with the radius A c, describe an are at c; then from the centre 11, with the radius B c, describe an arc intersecting the former: join A c, B c, and the triangle A c B is the figure required. The dimensions of any figure are taken on the principle above illustrated. If the figure is not triangular, it is divided into triangles, in the manner shown by Fig. 153, Nos. 1 and 2. In Fig. 154, Nos. 1 and 2, the manner of taking dimensions. when one or more sides of the figure are bounded by curves' lines. is illustrated. When, as at A B (No. 1), the side is a circular arc, its centre is obtained as follows: The extreme points A B, and the point of junction c of the intermediate line B C with A c and B C, give three points in the curve. From A and B, therefore, with any radius, describe arcs above and below the curve; from C, with the same radius, intersect these arcs; through the intersections draw straight lines meeting in n; and D is the centre of the curve, and PART X.--TIMBER WORK.-_ OINTS AND STRAPS.--P1.AT1-: I. shows a number of joints in framing that will frequently be found useful by the. workman. Fig. 1, No. 1, shows the joint formed by the meeting of a principal rafter and tie-beam, c being the tenon. The cheeks of the mortise are cut down to the line d f, so that an abutment, e 11, is formed of the whole width of the cheeks, in addition to that of.1 the tenon; and the notch so formed is called a joggle....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 40 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236895649
  • 9781236895646