Posthumous Works of Charles Otis Whitman; Professor of Zoology in the University of Chicago, 1892-1910; Director of Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, 1888-1908 Volume 257, V. 3

Posthumous Works of Charles Otis Whitman; Professor of Zoology in the University of Chicago, 1892-1910; Director of Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, 1888-1908 Volume 257, V. 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1919 edition. Excerpt: ...cycles of this female, of a masculine companion and participant in the task of incubation; her impulse to sit may have thus been weak at the time. Probably the introduction of a "novel stimu1us," namely, of a male to which she was not accustomed, had much to do with the disturbance. This latter fact would account for the disruption of the incubation, but it alone would not account for her ready acceptance of the male. The detailed records which justify the above analysis follow: Mar. 28.-----The male blond ring-dove (X) was purchased to-day. I have placed him with a female white ring-dove called W 1. The latter is one of two white rings bought in the previous November and then thought to be male and female; the second white bird, which also proved to be a female, I designated as W 2. W 1 is nearly ready to lay and is inclined to mate. The male is fierce and will not tolerate her presence, so I have to keep her in a small cage within his cage. On the following day the male was still intolerant, but began to yield a little. He went to the box and called; she at once responded and went to him, tried to take the nest, and began cooing in her turn. He endured it a while and then drove her off. He next went to the opposite box and repeated the same behavior with her. She is patient and takes all his abuse. By night he finally gets reconciled to her and condescends to sit beside her. Mar. 30.--The female laid an egg at about 5 p. m. The male has behaved towards her to-day about the same as yesterday, driving her about a good deal and not permitting her to remain long in the nest. He seemed to accept her when she answered his call to the nest; he often resigned it to her, but would soon return and drive her off and then call her back....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 98 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 191g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236755715
  • 9781236755711