Posthumous Works of Charles Otis Whitman; Professor of Zoology in the University of Chicago, 1892-1910; Director of Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, 1888-1908 Volume 1

Posthumous Works of Charles Otis Whitman; Professor of Zoology in the University of Chicago, 1892-1910; Director of Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, 1888-1908 Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1919 edition. Excerpt: ...short bars, one on the tertials (with one spot on the right wing and two on the left), and another on the inner long coverts (with three spots on the right wing and four on the left). These black ("steel-blue") spots are subterminal squarish blocks on the outer webs. On the inner webs of the tertials bearing the bar-spots I find elongate black spots reduced to narrow marginal streaks in most cases. A tertial with such a streak on the inner web extending nearly to its tip and a bar-spot on its outer web at a considerable distance from the tip presents a picture quite characteristic of the zenaidas and the mourningdoves. So close and peculiar a parallel in the mature patterns of these doves would lead us to expect fully as close a resemblance in the juvenal patterns; but Salvadori's description of the young cape-dove does not seem to confirm this anticipation. "The wing-coverts," as he reports, "are grayish-brown with blackish bands and whitish-buff apical spots." 4 Avicultural Magazine, Dec. 1906, p. 74. I' Ib1'd., June 1906, p. 251 THE TURTLE--DOVE PATTERN IN THE PHYLOGENY OF PIGEONS. According to Dr. Butler (Avic. Mag., n. s., Vol. II, p. 101), the young tambourinedove (Tympanistria tyimpanistria) is similarly marked: "All the feathers of the wing and tail are of a bright coffee-brown color with broad subterminal irregular transverse black bands." The figure given in a later volume of the same magazine (Vol. IV, page 308) makes it clear that the young tambourine rises to a stage of irregular cross-bars analogous to what is seen in the young inca-doves (Scardafella inca) and geopelias, in which we find the feathers edged apically with a pale straw-color (very narrow in inca but...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 124 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 236g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236751671
  • 9781236751676