Popular Treatise on the Patent Laws and Their Working and Reform for the Development of Arts and Manufactures and the Protection of Inventors

Popular Treatise on the Patent Laws and Their Working and Reform for the Development of Arts and Manufactures and the Protection of Inventors

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1874 edition. Excerpt: ...a man from the consequences of infringement on such grounds is a species of immorality which cannot be too severely censured.. It may be noted in passing, that the number of disclaimers applied for are only on an average of twelve per annum, a very small per-centage as compared with the number of Patents issued annually; thus it may be said that the system of disclaiming is used to a very limited extent, and is one of the. least objectionable features of the Patent Law. The patentee, however, can evade the necessity of a disclaimer thus--the act requires a full and true disclosure of the invention, but it leaves the inventor to give this disclosure in any particular form of words' he pleases. It is customary for patentees not only to describe their inventions, but to summarise briefly at the end of their specificatlons the particular features of novelty, in the form of 'claims.' The inventor, however, is not bound to give these claims, and it sometimes happens that when he either does not wish to say what part of the machine is new, or if he does not know whether any of it is new, he makes no specific claims. In such a case it will be obvious that, when he describes a whole machine, any part of it which he has invented must thereby be disclosed; but the difficulty is, for the public to know what part is new. A specification of this kind is most objectionable, as it gives the patentee a means of intimidating and persuading the unwary into paying royalties for alleged infringements, without indicating the precise nature of the infringement complained of, as every person is not aware that if the in ventor fails to make a full and true disclosure of his invention the Patent is void. At the close of the fourteen years the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 44 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236846907
  • 9781236846907