The Popular Encyclopedia; Being a General Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature, Biography, History, and Political Economy Volume 7

The Popular Encyclopedia; Being a General Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature, Biography, History, and Political Economy Volume 7

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1841 edition. Excerpt: ...of the Dahlia into England was, according to the Hor tut KewensU, by the marchioness of Bute, in 1789, but the plants, it may be presumed, were soon lost. In 1802 and 1803, others were sent from Paris; and in 1804, seeds from Madrid; yet, for several years, they were scarcely beard of amongst us. Their habits being unknown, their increase was slow; whilst, on the continent, innumerable and splendid varieties were produced; so that, after the peace, in 1814, they were poured upon us in all the variety of their present tints; exciting the astonishment of every beholder, and the joy of those who could number such beauties amongst their own collections. Since tbaj time they have been rapidly increased and improved; and England can now boast of varieties as superb as any in the world. Early sown seeds produce plants that will Sower in the succeeding autumn. The more certainly if fotced on a hot-bed. Roots keep very well in sand, in a dry cellar. In dividing them, the old stems may be slit, and a portion must be retained to each plant. Plant old roots in the first week of April; or pot them, force in a hot-bed, and turn into the borders when tbree or four inches high. A few may be retained in large pots; they will be less luxuriant, and flower earlier. Train one stem only from each root, and pinch off the lower-side shoots. The superfluous shoots from old roots, when taken off, may be planted in the shade, under a hand-glass, and will readily grow, as will cuttings of the older stems. Or cuttings of fine varieties may be grafted on the tubers of common ones, merely by splicing them together, tying, and enclosing them in a little clay, before tbey are potted in mould: they should then be put in a hotbed and shaded. A gravelly soil checks their...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 988 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 49mm | 1,724g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236584813
  • 9781236584816