The Popular Encyclopedia; Being a General Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature, Biography, History, and Political Economy Volume 3

The Popular Encyclopedia; Being a General Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature, Biography, History, and Political Economy Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1841 edition. Excerpt: ...of England, and the incessant terrors of Danish invasion, might have caused so ample a development of mental powers as would have created an early and complete English literature. Even.amid the agitating events of those turbulent times which followed his death, the voice of song at least was not silenced. How much of epic inspiration, as well as of national pride, still lives in the Saxon poem on the victory of Athelstan! By appealing to further evidence, and especially by turning once more to the materials furnished by the state of Iceland, and the rest of the Scandinavian territories, it would be easy to make out a pleasing picture of the genius of the middle ages at their close; but the appearance of new languages, and the fresh dawn of intellect in other parts of Europe, now invite our attention to a wider and more fruitful field of observation. We have already alluded to the confusion and debasement of language, produced by the torrent of immigration from the North, in those Southern countries over which it passed. Where the medium of thought was so corrupted, and while the virulence of the corruption endured, there could be no vernacular literature. But, force and activity of mind having been original attributes of the conquering race, and recollections of pristine glory still lingering among the conquered, it was to be expected that regularity and harmony of speech would ultimately reappear even out of the concussion of discordant elements. And thus, in the course of centuries, order in new and various shapes arose from previous confusion; the Latin and Teutonic tongues were blended together upon a principle of compromise; and hence proceeded all the chief dialects of Modern Europe. Over the South, from Portugal to Italy, the Latin...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 1030 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 51mm | 1,796g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236633199
  • 9781236633194