The Popular Encyclopedia; Being a General Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature, Biography, History, and Political Economy Volume 1

The Popular Encyclopedia; Being a General Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature, Biography, History, and Political Economy Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1841 edition. Excerpt: ...according to the length of time that the globe had been turned. Such was the origin of the famous Leyden phial experiment, which at first excited universal astonishment and terror; but was very soon exhibited in London and Paris, and indeed in all the large cities of Europe, and drew crowds of spectators to witness the phenomena, and to feel the shock. It was found that this shock could be given at once to any number of persons, provided they laid hold of each other's hands, and that every person (how great soever the number might be) received the shock at the same instant of time. Advantage was taken of this shock to determine the rate at which electricity moves. Dr Watson made an electric discharge pass through 12,276 feet of wire. One gentleman held a charged Leyden jar in one hand, and the extremity of the wire in the other. Another gentleman held the other extremity of the wire in one hand, and with the other brought a short iron rod in contact with the knob of the Leyden jar. The consequence was a discharge of electricity, and both the gentlemen received the charge at the same instant of time. So that electricity passes over a circuit of two miles instantaneously, or at least in an interval of time too short to be noticed. Indeed, in one of Dr Watson's experiments, the circuit through which the electricity passed was nearly six miles in length, yet no sensible interval of time was taken up by it in this long extent through which it had to pass. The first successful attempt to explain the phenomena of electricity was made by Dr Franklin, in a series of letters addressed to Peter Colinson, Esq., from Philadelphia in America. These letters had been offered to the Royal Society, but were refused a place in the transactions of that...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 1072 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 53mm | 1,869g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236524810
  • 9781236524812