The Popular and Critical Bible Encyclopaedia and Scriptural Dictionary; Fully Defining and Explaining All Religious Terms, Including Biographical, Geographical, Historical, Archaeological and Doctrinal Themes

The Popular and Critical Bible Encyclopaedia and Scriptural Dictionary; Fully Defining and Explaining All Religious Terms, Including Biographical, Geographical, Historical, Archaeological and Doctrinal Themes

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ...Egypt; also Hadjeens, Ashaary, Maherry, Reches, Badees at Herat, Rawakel and Racambel in India, all names more or less implying swiftness, the same as Spofuds, swift. 3. Uses. All camels, from their very birth, are taught to bend their limbs and lie down to receive a load or a rider. They are often placed circularly in a recumbent posture, and together with their loads form a sufficient rampart of defense against robbers on horseback. The milk of she-camels is still considered a very nutritive cooling drink, and when turned it becomes intoxicating. Their dung supplies fuel in the desert, and in sandy regions where wood is scarce; and occasionally it is a kind of resource for horses when other food is wanting in the wilderness. Their flesh, particularly the hunch, is in request among the Arabs, but was forbidden to the Hebrews, more perhaps from motives of economy and to keep the people from again becoming wanderers than from any real uncleanness. Camels were early a source of riches to the patriarchs, and from that period became an increasing object of rural importance to the several tribes of Israel, who inhabited the grazing and border districts, but still they never equaled the numbers possessed by the Arabs of the desert. In what manner the Hebrews derived the valuable remunerations obtainable from them does not directly appear, but it may be surmised that by means of their camels they were in possession of the whole trade that passed by land from Asia Minor and Syria to the Red Sea and Egypt, and from the Red Sea and Arabia toward the north, and to the Phoenician seaports. It is likely the word achashtcranim (Esth. viii: 10), rendered 'young dromedaries' (though Bochart regards it as meaning mules), implies the swift postage or...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 680 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 35mm | 1,193g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236884558
  • 9781236884558