The Pop, Rock, and Soul Reader

The Pop, Rock, and Soul Reader : Histories and Debates

3.8 (57 ratings by Goodreads)
Edited by 

List price: US$29.95

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

Tracing the diverse streams of American popular music from the 1920s to the present, The Pop, Rock, and Soul Reader: Histories and Debates addresses such questions as: How did the musicians who made the music explain it? Who listened to popular music and why? What was the major impression made by it on society at large? Why do some types of popular music still matter today? In this richly textured and chronologically organized anthology, well-known scholar David Brackett brings together more than 100 readings from a diverse range of sources and by writers who have played an integral part in the development of popular music criticism. He includes articles from mainstream and specialized magazines, scholarly journals, and newspapers, as well as interviews and autobiographies of musicians and other music industry insiders. Representing a wide variety of time periods, styles, and genres--and including groundbreaking criticism on disco, hip-hop, rap, and techno--the selections introduce students to important social and cultural issues raised by the study of popular music. Topics covered include the role of race, class conflict, gender roles, regional differences in the reception of popular music, and the relative value of artistry versus commerce. Extensive editorial introductions and headnotes supply context for the selections, provide links between different eras and genres, clarify the issues raised by the documents, and explain their historical significance. An ideal text for courses in popular music history, The Pop, Rock, and Soul Reader: Histories and Debates will also be of interest in courses on American music, American studies, media studies, history, and sociology.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 544 pages
  • 165.1 x 231.1 x 27.9mm | 793.8g
  • Oxford University Press Inc
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • 0195125711
  • 9780195125719
  • 2,003,165

Review quote

"The text I've been waiting for, for History of Rock classes. An intelligently selected and insightful collection of 'primary readings' that captures the excitement of an always changing musical form. (It's nice to see genres such as progressive rock and electronica represented as well, at last!)"--Kevin Holm-Hudson, University of Kentuckyshow more

Table of contents

CHAPTER 1. BEFORE 1950; 1. Technology, the Dawn of Popular Music, and the "King of Jazz"; 2. Big Band Swing Music; 3. Solo Pop Singers; 4. Hillbilly and Race Music; 5. Race Music and the Classic Blues; 6. Bessie Smith; 7. Country Blues/Delta Blues and Robert Johnson; 8. From Race Music to Rhythm and Blues; 9. T-Bone Walker; 10. Louis Jordan; 11. Johnny Otis; 12. Wynonie Harris; 13. The Producers Answer Back: The Emergence of the "Indie" Record Company; 14. Henry Glover; 15. Ahmet Ertegun; 16. Country Music as Folk Music, Country Music as Novelty; CHAPTER 2. THE 1950S; 1. Country Music Approaches the Mainstream; 2. Hank Williams; 3. Rhythm and Blues in the Early 1950s: B.B. King; 4. "The House that Ruth Brown Built"; 5. Ray Charles, or When Saturday Night Mixed it Up with Sunday Morning; 6. Jerry Wexler: A Life in R & B; 7. The Growing Threat of Rhythm and Blues; 8. From Rhythm and Blues to Rock 'n' Roll: The Songs of Chuck Berry; 9. Little Richard: Boldly Going Where No Man Had Gone Before; 10. Elvis Presley, Sam Phillips, and Rockability; 11. Rock 'n' Roll Meets the Popular Press; 12. The Music Industry Fights Against Rock 'n' Roll: Dick Clark's Teen-Pop Empire and the Payola Scandal; CHAPTER 3. THE 1960S; 1. Brill Building; 2. Surf; 3. Urban Rock/Folk Rock; 4. Bob Dylan; 5. Dylan Meets the Press; 6. From R & B to Soul: Early 1960s Soul/R & B; 7. No Town like Motown; 8. James Brown and the Beginnings of Funk; 9. Southern Soul and Otis Redding; 10. Aretha Franklin; 11. The British Invastion, Part 1: The Beatles; 12. A Hard Day's Night, and Further Incursion into the World of Critical Respectability; 13. The British Invasion, Part 2: The Rolling Stones, Art School, and British Blues Revival; 14. The Stones vs. The Beatles; 15. The Who, The Kinks, and Other Deviant Phenomena; 16. San Francisco: The Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead; 17. Janis Joplin; 18. Santana; 19. Hendrix; 20. Rock Meets the Avant-Garde: Frank Zappa; 21. Pop/Bubblegum/Monkees; 22. The Aesthetics of Rock; 23. Festivals: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly; CHAPTER 4. THE 1970S; 1. Where Did the Sixties Go?; 2. Singer-Songwriters; 3. Joni Mitchell: Do Singer-Songwriters Represent the Female Side of Rock?; 4. Funk-Sly Stone; 5. Not-so-"little" Stevie Wonder; 6. Parliament Drops the Bomb; 7. Heavy Metal Meets the Counterculture; 8. Led Zeppelin Speaks!; 9. Glam; 10. Rock Me Amadeus; 11. Jazz Fusion; 12. Get on Up Disco; 13. Punk: The Sound of Criticism?; 14. Punk Crosses the Atlantic; 15. Punk to New Wave?; 16. UK New Wave; CHAPTER 5. THE 1980S; 1. A Second British Invasion?; 2. Who Really Wanted Their MTV?; 3. Thriller Begets the "King of Pop"; 4. Madonna and the Performance of Identity; 5. Bruce Springsteen: Reborn in the USA; 6. R & B: Crossing Over or Going Under?; 7. Heavy Metal Thunders On!; 8. Metal in the Late Eighties: Glam or Trash?; 9. Post-Punk Goes Indie; 10. Alternative Brings the Noise; 11. Hip Hop, Don't Sto; CHAPTER 6. THE 1990S AND BEYOND; 1. Rap into the 90s: Gangstas, Playa-hatas, Fly Girls, and the Big Bling Bling; 2. Keeping It a Little Too Real; 3. Sampling the Old Bling Bling; 4. Women in Rap, Part II; 5. The Beat Goes On; 6. From Indie to Alternative to...Seattle; 7. Riot Girl; 8. Grunge Turns to Scrunge; 9. An American Tragedy; 10. Two "Post-Alternative"Icons; 11. If "We Are the World," then Who Are "We" and Where is the "World?"; 12. A Talking Head Writes; 13. Genre or Gender? The Year (or Two or Three) of the "Girls"; 14. Pubic Policy and Pop Music History Collide; 15. Electronica is in the House; 16. R & B Divas Go Retro; 17. What Have We Come To?show more

Rating details

57 ratings
3.8 out of 5 stars
5 25% (14)
4 35% (20)
3 39% (22)
2 0% (0)
1 2% (1)
Book ratings by Goodreads
Goodreads is the world's largest site for readers with over 50 million reviews. We're featuring millions of their reader ratings on our book pages to help you find your new favourite book. Close X