The Poor Law Amendment ACT; With a Commentary on the Powers of the Commissioners, and a General Introductory View, Showing How the ACT Affects the Law

The Poor Law Amendment ACT; With a Commentary on the Powers of the Commissioners, and a General Introductory View, Showing How the ACT Affects the Law

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1834 edition. Excerpt: ... of the items included in one class of accounts, namely, the first class required to be kept in the incorporations. The second remedial provision is, a similar power to take averages at any future time for the purpose of fixing anew the dilferent proportions of future contributions. But there is this difference between the two provisions; first, that under the latter provision, the proportions found to exist among the new averages, that is, those taken under this latter power, are to be the proportions of the future contributions, and the commissioners have not the power (contained in the above italics) to modify them; and secondly, that the sums paid parishes of such unions, is assessed upon such parishes in the respective proportions fixed at the period by the diflerent parishes to the common fund under the first assessment of the commissioners, are to be taken (so far as they go) to be the just proportions; whereas, under the former proceeding, the sums paid according to the original averages were regarded as untrue proportions. And this is manifestly a defect in the provision; for, suppose in the case of any parish, under Gilbert's Act, the old p!'0p0r[ tion, in respect of the first class of accounts, to be one, and the just proportion to be ten, but that the commissioners, for the sake of conciliation, raised the proportion only to five in the first instance, leaving it still one half too low, in the exercise of the discretion given to them; the absence of a similar power to modify the proportions, and the different mode of taking one portion of the account, will in effect make this inequality (so far as it goes) perpetual; the inference is, that either the commissioners should not have the discretionary power at all, or that it...
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Product details

  • Paperback | 58 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 122g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236632516
  • 9781236632517