The Politics of Sentiment

The Politics of Sentiment : Churches and Foreign Investment in South Africa

By (author) 

List price: US$39.99

Currently unavailable

We can notify you when this item is back in stock

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

A unique, timely, and important contribution to our understanding of American influence on developments in South Africa.
show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 178 pages
  • 152 x 224 x 13mm | 277g
  • Washington, United States
  • English
  • 0896330885
  • 9780896330887

Review quote

No one engaged in this debate can afford to overlook the evidence marshalled in this book. It is a sterling service to intelligent moral discourse on one of the most agonizing foreign policy questions facing the United States. -- Richard John Neuhaus, The Institute on Religion and Public Life; Editor, FIRST THINGS A unique, timely, and important contribution to our understanding of American influence on developments in South Africa. It will help all conscientious and thinking people in the United States to appreciate more fully the dynamics of constructive change. -- Richard E. Bissell, Editor, THE WASHINGTON QUARTERLY Excellent ammunition for the escalating war of words over divestment. -- Fred Stokeld, Chamber of Commerce of the United States Excellent ammunition for the escalating war of words over divestment. -- Fred Stokeld, Chamber of Commerce of the United States No one engaged in this debate can afford to overlook the evidence marshalled in this book. It is a sterling service to intelligent moral discourse on one of the most agonizing foreign policy questions facing the United States. -- Richard John Neuhaus, The Institute on Religion and Public Life; Editor, FIRST THINGS A unique, timely, and important contribution to our understanding of American influence on developments in South Africa. It will help all conscientious and thinking people in the United States to appreciate more fully the dynamics of constructive change. -- Richard E. Bissell, Editor, THE WASHINGTON QUARTERLY
show more